Review: “The Gadget” A Glock Striker Control Device (12 month review)

Todd Louis Green of Pistol-Training.com (Rest In Peace, Brother) devised a gadget that allows the user to ‘thumb’ the back of the slide, like you would on an exposed hammer double-action gun, and be able to feel if the trigger is moving. Read all about it in this link.

Here, Todd explains its operation on a cutaway glock.

It replaces the back plate of your Glock pistol and has a hinged section that rides the striker as it moves rearward, which can be interrupted by simple thumb pressure. It adds a tactile feedback for the user to know if some unseen piece of clothing or floppy-holster is depressing the trigger, which would result in a negligent discharge.

Given Todd’s propensity for Appendix Inside the Waistband (AIWB) carry (and mine too), there is peace of mind to have another layer of safety, besides a safe repeatable reholstering technique, against putting a round through my groin.

How did I get one a year ago? They’re not officially shipping yet!

I ordered one on the Indie Go-Go page, and told Todd I was excited about getting it, to which he said, “Dude, why didn’t you ask me for one, I’ll send the paperwork and we’ll get you set up!” I wasn’t expecting that response, but that’s the kind of guy Todd was. Anyway, he promptly sent the paperwork, and shortly thereafter I received and installed my gadget.

The to-be production models recently were out of spec and had issues with the finish, so Tom J. rejected them until they are of the fit and finish that is expected.

The Good, Bad, and Ugly:

Plus:

  • It allows you to stop an accidental discharge upon holstering.
  • Ease of installation. It’s as simple as replacing the back slide cover plate.

Minus:

  • There was a time when my gadget was dry and dirty and I felt like there was some resistance during the trigger press. It is another moving part after all, and as such, can get dry and gritty. I put a single drop of lubricant on it every few months and it swings freely.
  • You can’t do a contact shot and hold your opposite palm over the rear of the slide to keep the gun in battery. But good retention shooting doesn’t include this sort of forced contact shot. A solid number 2 position with good limb/position control is what you should be striving for anyway.
  • Entry point for dirt. If I were in a place where there was lots of silty sand and dirt, I’d probably not use one. However, Craig Douglas of Shivworks had these in his SIMUNITION guns, and those guns are dragged through the dirt ALL DAY, and he had success with them.
Fully Extended (it's free to move)
Possible crud entry point
  • People will think your Glock is broken. This happened to me several times.

Conclusion:

Since my hierarchy for pistol selection/need is they make it easier to:

  1. Not Shoot Ourselves
  2. Not Shoot What We Don’t Want To Shoot
  3. Shoot What We Want To Shoot

ANYTHING that allows me to increase my margin of safety when handling my gun day-to-day, that doesn’t impede reliability is a GO in my book. For the most part, I have switched over to a double action gun for reasons stated in this post. The Glock wears a Gadget.

You will be able to get yours Soon™.

Thank you,

Mark

If you find value in my ramblings, please subscribe, share, and shop through our amazon affiliate link.